IndieView with Gary Starta, author of Demon Inhibitions

I like to write with the reader in mind. I try to give them all the twists and turns and emotional turbulence one can from the plot and character interaction. I think a great novel always combine a strong plot with remarkable characters.

Gary Starta – 3 Nov 2012

The Back Flap

Most people don’t travel to another universe to get a new job, house and boyfriend but psychic investigator Caitlin Diggs did. Now she’s living the life of her alternate self, working for the FBI’s Preternatural Division where her first case just happens to include chasing a genetically engineered man hell bent on stealing souls. Well, there had to be consequences.

About the book

What is the book about?

I decided to go first person narrative with Demon Inhibitions, giving the protagonist Caitlin Diggs a more urgent voice in the book. As an FBI agent, dealing with newly acquired paranormal abilities, I believed Diggs’ firsthand observations would be essential to transmit her feelings to readers.

It is about an FBI agent who decides to leave the Bureau after acquiring paranormal abilities from an artifact. Realizing her superiors are more bureaucratic than passionate about solving cases, Diggs decides to utilize her abilities in the private sector as a PI. But when she arrives in Salem, Massachusetts she is asked by a friend to assist in a manhunt of a person humans believe to be a serial killer. This killer, Diggs realizes, is not just a serial killer. He is a soul stealer. Her chase takes her to a parallel world where she again assumes a position at the Bureau but in this world, a preternatural division is in place. It gives Diggs hope she can stop the demon in an unconventional manner.

When did you start writing the book?

Three years ago.

How long did it take you to write it?

It actually took six months but when you add in editing and submitting and placing the book with the publisher it comes to three years.

Where did you get the idea from?

I love the paranormal and science fiction. I believed a genetically-created demon might be of interest to those who love those genres as well.

Were there any parts of the book where you struggled?

Maybe the ending battle scene, but with Diggs speaking in the first person it was fairly easy. I let the character guide me.

What came easily?

The narrative because I believed I knew the character well enough at that point to speak in her tone and make judgments based on her feelings.

Are your characters entirely fictitious or have you borrowed from real world people you know?

They are fictitious. I generally prefer to escape the real world.

We all know how important it is for writers to read. Are there any particular authors that have influenced how you write and, if so, how have they influenced you?

I would say Dean Koontz. His storytelling, dialogue and creation of characters are always believable.

Do you have a target reader?

A science fiction reader foremost, but I believe I mix in enough other genres like suspense and romance to keep interest of those who might not normally read the genre.

About Writing

Do you have a writing process? If so can you please describe it?

The process is haphazard at best. I get some ideas, jot down some notes and allow it to gel in my mind. I plan a time to write my next chapter and utilize some of my ideas but also write off the cuff. There really is no formula which makes it exciting.

Do you outline? If so, do you do so extensively or just chapter headings and a couple of sentences?

No, not in any traditional sense or in any format one could understand. Lol.

Do you edit as you go or wait until you’ve finished?

A mix but major editing comes at the completion of the novel.

Did you hire a professional editor?

I am edited by the small presses who publish me.

Do you listen to music while you write? If yes, what gets the fingers tapping? 

I am afraid that would throw me out of the world I am creating. Although I love music, I prefer writing in quiet.

About Publishing

Did you submit your work to Agents?

Yes.

What made you decide to go Indie? Was it a particular event or a gradual process?

It was a logical progression. If agents and major publishers reject your proposals there is really no other options.

Did you get your book cover professionally done or did it you do it yourself?

Again, that’s done by the small press publisher.

Do you have a marketing plan for the book or are you just winging it?

I do a lot of social media which is how I found out about Indie View. I guess I am winging it. I wish someone would say marketing is a science that can be learned but after hearing professional publishers speak, I get a feeling they rely on instinct more than a plan.

Any advice that you would like to give to other newbies considering becoming Indie authors?  

It’s going to be hard. You’ll have to love what you’re doing. You’re going to be spending a lot of alone time with your characters.

About You

I originally wrote as a journalist before contemplating fiction.

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Massachusetts.

Where do you live now?

 I’ve spent the last two decades in New Jersey.

What would you like readers to know about you?

I like to write with the reader in mind. I try to give them all the twists and turns and emotional turbulence one can from the plot and character interaction. I think a great novel always combine a strong plot with remarkable characters.

What are you working on now?

I am just completing a novel about paranormal investigators.

End of Interview:

For more from Gary you can visit his website or his blog, like his page on Facebook, or check out his Goodreads author page.

Get your copy of Demon Inhibitions from Amazon US, Amazon UK, or Barnes & Noble.

3 Responses to IndieView with Gary Starta, author of Demon Inhibitions

  1. I enjoyed this interview–nice structure too. Thanks.

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