Category Archives: Indieview author

IndieView with Sahar Ayachi, author of The Orchid

That being said, the one message I would like to convey to all readers through Lola’s story is that people come in various shapes and sizes, yes, but they also come in various mindsets and psychological states. Everyone has their own struggles and their own way of dealing with them.

Sahar Ayachi – 23 May 2017

The Back Flap

“You will bring light to my darkness, you will bring hope to my despair. You will be my knight though you will first be a slave, but I know which spots to hit to make you brave.”
Dreamy, impulsive, but mostly confused—this is Lola. On a journey where she just tries to live, love, and be loved, Lola is being followed by the one thing she thought she escaped from—a presence that will find her wherever she goes… a presence that isn’t happy with her decisions—not happy at all.
Follow Lola through a story where the lines between dreams and reality are blurred, where she will be faced with struggle—emotionally and physically—and where she is trying her best to make sense of the confusing situation she got herself into.
What is this scary unknown that Lola is running away from, and will she eventually be able to face it?

About the book

What is the book about?

The Orchid is a novel that tells the story of a young girl called Lola who travels far away from her home country, escaping a secret she has always had, and that started to become unbearable. That’s how her new adventure begins. She settles in a new place, begins a new life and starts believing she successfully managed to run away.

But, what Lola ignores is that her secret never left her. It will start to manifest itself to her in strange ways she won’t understand at first. She will struggle, physically and mentally; she will be dragged into some kind of a weird “game” that will make her confuse dream and reality… until she will eventually fall face to face with the embodiment of her secret and will have to face it.

The book is a little difficult for me to “categorize”. It falls under “general fiction”, but it has a big love storyline and an even bigger psychological component. We can say that this book is the story of a person suffering from a light case of psychosis, trying to find her way through a specific portion of her life.

When did you start writing the book?

I started writing this book in May-June 2016, but some sections of it have been written for almost 10 years already.

How long did it take you to write it?

All in all, nine months.

Where did you get the idea from?

The idea to write this book came to me early in 2016, when I decided to gather old and new writings of mine. In doing so, I noticed there were several essays that talked about almost the same topic. So, I decided to collect them and build a story around them. That’s what I meant earlier by “some sections of it have been written for almost 10 years already.”

Were there any parts of the book where you struggled?

Yes, there were! I had two major struggles while writing this book:

  • Writing “on demand”: even though I have been writing for almost 15 years now, I never sat down with a pen and a paper and decided “ok, let’s write”. Writing, for me, has been a very personal activity. I wrote to express myself, to deal with various situations, because I was never courageous/capable enough to openly express myself. While writing this book, I had deadlines to respect (that I set to myself), and so, there were many times where I had to actually sit down and start writing. It became a little easier with time, but it still is a major issue until now.
  • Disconnecting the character of Lola from my own person: like I mentioned, writing has always been a personal activity. Most of what I wrote was about myself, even though I didn’t always write in first person. To deal with the author block that came with the “writing on demand” issue, I had to dig in my own past experiences to find the proper emotions. As the book isn’t really a happy story, and as some parts of Lola’s storyline are based on my own life, it was very stressful to bring up older feelings and emotions. What didn’t help was the fact that the book was written in first person, at first; until one day I decided to turn every “I” into a “she”.

What came easily?

Descriptions of feelings. As you might have guessed by now, there is a huge emotional component to The Orchid. Finding the right emotional setting was a struggle, but once I got there, it just streamed like magic. I loved using all kind of figures of speech: comparisons, metaphors, pleonasms, personifications, hyperboles, euphemisms, antiphrasis, oxymora… I wanted to convey the message so clearly, I might have overdone it a little bit with descriptions.

Are your characters entirely fictitious or have you borrowed from real world people you know?

All characters are borrowed from real world people I know. Even though the book only focuses on 2 characters, apart from Lola, each one is inspired from several real-world people.

We all know how important it is for writers to read. Are there any particular authors that have influenced how you write and, if so, how have they influenced you?

There is one author in particular that has influenced me the most, and that’s Amélie Nothomb. I love her style of writing so much, I keep reading and re-reading her books. Unwillingly, I found myself writing in a style that is, I wouldn’t dare to say similar, but clearly influenced by hers: the important presence of different figures of speech, the use of complex images and figurative ways to describe easier events…

Do you have a target reader?

Not really. I would say maybe an adult or young adult audience, due to the (light) presence of one or two intimate scenes, but no real restrictions. That being said, the one message I would like to convey to all readers through Lola’s story is that people come in various shapes and sizes, yes, but they also come in various mindsets and psychological states. Everyone has their own struggles and their own way of dealing with them. In the book, there’s a lot of talks and conversations that just happen in the main character’s head to explain the reasons behind her reactions and behaviors. It’s targeted to those who would relate to her as well as those who wouldn’t understand people like her.

About Writing

Do you have a writing process? If so can you please describe it?

I usually don’t. I just write whenever I have something to express, so I just sit and do it. That being said, the process for this book in particular was to first gather two or three older essays I wrote before, with a couple other newer ones and think about the full story. Some of these became the first chapters, some went to the end. I had to fill in the blanks in between, aka the core of the story.

Do you outline? If so, do you do so extensively or just chapter headings and a couple of sentences?

Yes, absolutely. The general idea and progress of the story was clear in my mind since the beginning. I knew how I wanted the book to start and how I wanted it to end. I had a clear outline written down with the various chapters and the main idea in each one. Of course, the idea organization and some of the content was modified a few times as the story progressed, but the general outlining stayed the same.

Do you edit as you go or wait until you’ve finished?

I usually wait until I am finished to edit. I wrote my book as separate chapters first, and not in order, then connected them. First, there was chapter editing, then a general editing once I put all parts together.

Did you hire a professional editor?

For the content, no, I did not hire a professional editor. I still got an editor/writer to read and review my final manuscript. For the layout/internal design editing, it was done by professional from the publisher I worked with.

Do you listen to music while you write? If yes, what gets the fingers tapping?

I don’t. I usually need complete silence to write. It gets too loud in my head already when I write, and sometimes thoughts become faster than my writing speed. I wouldn’t be able to catch up and concentrate in the presence of any other type of noise around.

About Publishing

Did you submit your work to Agents?

As a newbie author, I signed a self-publishing contract with Partridge Singapore in June 2016 because the publishing plan they provided sounded interesting for first time writers. I was, and still am, very new to the world of authors and publishers, so I am learning as I go.

What made you decide to go Indie, whether self-publishing or with an indie publisher? Was it a particular event or a gradual process?

I just decided to go indie because first, I am still very new to the field, but also because the self-published contract I found had no strict deadlines. When I signed it, I was still doing my masters of science in a very demanding field, so I didn’t want more strict deadlines in my life.

Did you get your book cover professionally done or did you do it yourself?

My book cover was designed by a designer friend of mine. I would like to call it “professionally” done, because she has put so much effort and professionalism into it. But maybe just like my “indie” content editor, my cover was also done by an “indie” designer.

Do you have a marketing plan for the book or are you just winging it?

I am just winging it honestly. As my publisher is in Singapore, and as I am currently back to my home country (Tunisia), I am trying to get as much online marketing as possible. It’s not easy, but it’s a very interesting experience. I am learning so much as I go, and I love it!

Any advice that you would like to give to other newbies considering becoming Indie authors?

It’s not going to be an easy task! You will find yourself doing most of the work alone, whether it’s editing, designing and especially marketing, publicity and reviews. But it’s an amazing experience with all its challenges and its frustrations. Every small step will feel like an immense win, you will have more opportunities to feel accomplished and happy about your own achievements. Such moments are what make the indie experience worth it.

About You

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Tunisia, North Africa. Born and raised there, and even though I traveled abroad a lot, I only really left in 2011, when I moved to Seoul, South Korea for undergraduate studies.

Where do you live now?

Right now, I am back in Tunisia for some time.

What would you like readers to know about you?

I would like my readers to know that I am just a girl trying to find her way through life. I do so with a huge interest in scientific fields (in which I majored for my bachelor and my master studies), and an even bigger interest in writing. The Orchid is my very first published work, but I also write song lyrics. I am currently working on musical projects, and potentially another book, so you’ll probably see me again. In the meanwhile, I keep myself busy with reading and reviewing, dancing, traveling and learning all the languages my brain can fit.

What are you working on now?

Right now, I am working on song lyrics for some musical projects. I am taking a break from book writing for a while, but my brain is always active. I am considering a continuity to Lola’s story, but also couple other unrelated ideas, which will be developed later.

End of Interview:

For more from Sahar, follow her on Twitter.

Get your copy of The Orchid from Amazon US or Amazon UK.

IndieView with Max E. Stone, author of One Minute There

I’m a reader who likes a little of everything in the books I read so I wrote for the reader that likes that, too. This one is a mystery/thriller with a couple drops of romance. 

Max E. Stone – 20 May 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Khaled Talib, author of Incognito

I’m realistic to know the publishing world has change. Nobody knows for sure where it’s going and how it will end. At least not now. So I’ll take what’s the best situation for me. 

Khaled Talib – 16 May 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Jason Pomerance, author of Women Like Us

I do some outlining but mostly I like to let the characters take over and take me where they want to go. I like to be surprised by my characters, and what they decide to do with themselves. It is important, though, I think to have a general idea of a beginning, a middle and an end. Even if it’s just a rough idea.  

Jason Pomerance – 11 May 2017

The Back Flap

Susan Jones, a brash and ballsy chef who hopscotches from one demanding restaurant job to the next, was barely in her twenties when she married and had a son, Henry. But after her marriage to Andrew fell apart, she ceded most of the raising of the baby to her mother-in-law, the very opinionated Edith Vale, a woman as formidable and steely as her stiff blond bouffant, the veritable helmet that helps her soldier through life. Now, after letting Henry drift away, Susan is determined to make things right. But just as mother and son seem to make headway after embarking on a cross-country road trip, things take a dark turn. When the family reconvenes in California, everybody must fight to find courage and humor in the face of a situation that threatens to change them all forever.

About the book

What is the book about?

Women Like Us tells the story of an extended family and how it copes when one member of the family faces a daunting struggle. It’s also about second chances, and redemption plays a role too.

When did you start writing the book? 

I began writing the book several years ago, but I didn’t write it from beginning to end in one sitting. I would work on it, put it aside, then go back to it.

How long did it take you to write it? 

It took quite a while to get the book in shape.  But like I mentioned, I didn’t write it one sitting, so it’s hard to pinpoint exactly how long.  It was a few years, on and off.

Where did you get the idea from? 

The book actually began its life as a screenplay.  I had been wanting to write a mother/son road movie, but as I kept outlining and developing the characters, it started to feel more like a novel.  So I just kept writing.

Were there any parts of the book where you struggled?

Oh, yes!  Often there were periods of struggle, especially in early sections — getting the tone, and the plotting right.

What came easily? 

The character Edith Vale, for some reason, sprang to life almost fully formed it seemed. It was always a pleasure to write the chapters with Edith in them. In fact, I’d miss her if she was absent for too long.

Are your characters entirely fictitious or have you borrowed from real world people you know?  

Oh, I would say I’ve definitely borrowed from the real world. I think all novelists do, in one way or another.

We all know how important it is for writers to read. Are there any particular authors that have influenced how you write and, if so, how have they influenced you? 

I worship at the altar of Anne Tyler.  I think she’s just brilliant in the way she takes real world, everyday characters and makes them so much larger than life.  I’ve read almost every Tyler book, some more than once or even more than twice.

Do you have a target reader? 

Women seem to like this book the most.  But I wouldn’t want to categorize the book as Women’s Fiction — I’ve had lots of men tell me they liked it and relate to it too.

About Writing

Do you have a writing process? If so can you please describe it? 

I am pretty disciplined when it comes to writing. I like to write early in the morning, when things are quiet, and then revise and edit later in the day.

Do you outline? If so, do you do so extensively or just chapter headings and a couple of sentences? 

I do some outlining but mostly I like to let the characters take over and take me where they want to go. I like to be surprised by my characters, and what they decide to do with themselves.  It is important, though, I think to have a general idea of a beginning, a middle and an end. Even if it’s just a rough idea.  Because certainly things might change as you go along.

Do you edit as you go or wait until you’ve finished? 

I edit as I go, and then again when done.  I’ve often found that earlier parts of a piece of work may have changed based on what happens as the plot unfolds so it’s important to go back and make edits.

Did you hire a professional editor?

I did not.  I know a lot of people in and around publishing who were willing to read and give notes.  Then the book got a very thorough and exhaustive copy edit from Inkshares.

Do you listen to music while you write? If yes, what gets the fingers tapping? 

Not while writing, but sometimes during rewrites and edits.  The Beatles always works for me, especially Hey Jude.

About Publishing

Did you submit your work to Agents? 

Yes. The book was actually repped by an agent at one point. We had a parting of a ways, though.

What made you decide to go Indie, whether self-publishing or with an indie publisher? Was it a particular event or a gradual process? 

I stumbled onto crowd-fund publisher Inkshares sort of by a fluke.  I spotted an article in Deadline Hollywood about how they had signed a deal with talent agency UTA to rep screen rights of Inkshares projects.  I had never done any kind of crowd-funding but I decided to take a leap and give it a try. Best decision I ever made because now I can hold the book in my hands, and there’s nothing like that.  But crowd-funding is also very hard work, almost harder than the actual writing, I sometimes think.

Did you get your book cover professionally done or did you do it yourself? 

The cover was done by a professional.  Although I had a lot of input into decisions about it.

Do you have a marketing plan for the book or are you just winging it? 

As part of the Quill Imprint of Inkshares you get a small bit of help with marketing, but not a lot. I learned much about marketing as I went along.  I’m still learning.

Any advice that you would like to give to other newbies considering becoming Indie authors? 

It’s all about marketing!  Be prepared to do anything and everything to get your book into reader’s hands.

About You

Where did you grow up?

I was born in New York City and grew up on the east coast.

Where do you live now? 

Los Angeles.

What would you like readers to know about you? 

I love to surf, but I’m really bad at it!  It’s one of my goals in life to be the surfer that I am in my head!

What are you working on now? 

A second novel called Celia At 39, which is about to be shopped to agents.

End of Interview:

For more from Jason, visit his website, follow him on Twitter, or like his Facebook page.

Get your copy of Women Like Us from Amazon US or Amazon UK.

BookView with Jarod Powell, author of She Burned Me Alive

Sometimes I feel like I’m putting my ignorance on display by incorporating sociological elements into my fiction. In a way, I’m doing here what I said I would never do: get political. But I’ve learned firsthand that the political is always personal, and there’s no avoiding it – ever.

Jaron Powell – 6 May 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Emily Page, author of Fractured Memories

My dad was my best friend. He embraced the ridiculous, looked for the good in people, and mentored and helped people whenever he could. Following his diagnosis, when people asked how he was doing, he’d answer, ‘Not bad for a demented guy.’ He looked for the light hiding amidst the pain. He chose to be very open about what he was going through in the hopes that it would help other people cope with their own diagnosis or a loved one’s diagnosis. Writing this book seemed a fitting way to honor that legacy.

Emily Page – 4 May 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Mary Ann D’Alto, author of He Counts Their Tears

Women will be fascinated by the way Aaron lures his targets. Men will finally get an answer to the looming question; why is it that women fall for the bad boys, and not the nice guys?

Mary Ann D’Alto – 2 May 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Brian Fitzpatrick, author of Mechcraft

 

One of the most valuable lessons I learned in screenwriting is the vomit draft. This is the first draft we must force ourselves to finish, no matter how bad. I apply this rule to my prose, and don’t allow myself to stop and edit until the vomit draft is done.

Brian Fitzpatrick – 29 April 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Ralph Webster, author of A Smile in One Eye: a Tear in the Other

Today, immigration and refugee issues continue to dominate the news. Too many people forget that refugees fleeing their homelands are not the enemy. They are the victims.

Ralph Webster – 27 April 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Nicholas Nash, author of The Girl at the Bar

I enjoyed all the research that went into the book. There are so many small facts and interesting tidbits that I found while doing my research and I strung them all together into the book, be it some obscure facts about cancer, the Chinese underworld in New York or some fancy computer programs that play a key role in the book. 

Nicholas Nash – 25 April 2017

The Back Flap

Rebecca, a brilliant cancer researcher disappears without a trace after a one-night stand with a neurotic man with a questionable past. Her sudden disappearance in the midst of a high-stakes quest to cure cancer between two rival billionaires sets into motion an inexplicable chain of events as the bodies start to pile up. No one knows why she disappeared. The race to find answers ensnares everyone around her, one of whom is a deeply disturbed psychopath lurking in the shadows.

Is Rebecca still alive? What happened to her? Who did it? And why? Questions about her vex everyone looking for answers. No one can be trusted and no one is above suspicion.

About the book

What is the book about?

The Girl at the Bar starts off with the disappearance of a top cancer researcher, Rebecca Chase, after she has a one-night stand with someone she meets in a bar.

The book is a classic whodunit with a lot of twists and turns. I cover the topic of cancer as a disease and the latest developments in cancer research in the book in a manner that the reader can follow. That said, the book is about people, how they think and how they react in situations.

I wrote the book trying to keep the reader at the edge right up to the end. I hope readers of the book feel the same way.

When did you start writing the book?

I have been writing for around a year. I started writing my book in summer. I tried writing the book in various different places in the city where I live. I enjoyed all the research that went into the book. There are so many small facts and interesting tidbits that I found while doing my research and I strung them all together into the book, be it some obscure facts about cancer, the Chinese underworld in New York or some fancy computer programs that play a key role in the book.

How long did it take you to write it?

It took me around a year to complete the book.

Where did you get the idea from?

There is some truly groundbreaking research and developments taking place in the quest to cure cancer that the average person is not aware of. The biotech industry in general is making huge advances in finding unique cures for cancer. I wanted to highlight the work that I have been reading about.

The biotech industry, particularly on the research side, is heavily dominated by men. However, there are several strong well-rounded women who are instrumental in the industry either as researchers, CEOs or biotech investors. Rebecca is in some respects a composite of these real-life women who play a key role in the progress we’ve made in the war on cancer.

I believe The Girl At The Bar will help readers learn a lot about the mysterious world of cancer. Pair that with a roller coaster mystery and this will be a book readers will be happy they picked up.

Were there any parts of the book where you struggled?

The biggest challenge in writing about cancer research is being able to synthesize all the research into plain language that a regular reader can understand and appreciate. That was the toughest part of the research. I was constantly afraid that readers would lose me if I became too technical in my descriptions, so that kept me on guard whenever I wrote about cancer in the book.

Are your characters entirely fictitious or have you borrowed from real world people you know?

For the book, I drew inspiration from my own real life experiences in creating settings, characters or story lines. I have met some very interesting people in my life. The characters are composites of several people, borrowing interesting features and creating a character that is completely different from others but at the same time interesting and striking, someone you would like to read about and root for.

We all know how important it is for writers to read. Are there any particular authors that have influenced how you write and, if so, how have they influenced you?

I enjoyed reading Ayn Rand (Atlas Shrugged) and Daniel Yergin (The Prize). Their work is sweeping in vision with a whole bunch of interesting characters and intriguing story lines that are grand. In the case of The Prize, those are real people and real history. I enjoy reading stories with multiple characters and complex intertwined story lines. Simple two or three character stories don’t appeal to me much.

I immensely enjoyed Andy Weir’s The Martian. When I found out that Andy was a first time writer but wrote about what he knew best, I was really inspired to follow in his footsteps and write about topics that I knew quite a bit about – cutting edge research for cancer.

Do you have a target reader?

Readers who enjoy fast paced thrillers will love the book.

About Writing

Do you have a writing process? If so can you please describe it?

I have been writing for around a year. I started writing my book in summer. I tried writing the book in various different places in the city where I live. I enjoyed all the research that went into the book. There are so many small facts and interesting tidbits that I found while doing my research and I strung them all together into the book, be it some obscure facts about cancer, the Chinese underworld in New York or some fancy computer programs that play a key role in the book.

Do you outline? If so, do you do so extensively or just chapter headings and a couple of sentences?

I wrote the first few chapters impromptu. Once the story started taking twists and turns I had to create an outline for the book. I had the whole book mapped out before I could write the last few chapters.

Do you edit as you go or wait until you’ve finished?

I usually edit if I reread any chapter or after the book is done.

Do you listen to music while you write? If yes, what gets the fingers tapping?

Sometimes I listen to music when I am writing. I like to listen to rock music. Besides the usual staple of Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Def Leppard and Guns N Roses, I like The Veils, Home Ties, Kings At Heart and Light Your Anchor. The Veils has an incredible discography. Finn Andrews is highly underrated and probably one of the best song writers of his generation.

About Publishing

Did you submit your work to Agents?

No, I didn’t submit my work to any agent. I chanced upon meeting my publisher from Fireflies Publishing. She loved the book and added a few fantastic ideas so I decided to work with her on the book.

What made you decide to go Indie, whether self-publishing or with an indie publisher? Was it a particular event or a gradual process?

It just happened. I like to go with the flow and I thought I would establish myself before reaching out as an unknown author to traditional publishers.

Did you get your book cover professionally done or did you do it yourself?

The book cover has been done professionally. It went through numerous edits before the final one was created.

Do you have a marketing plan for the book or are you just winging it?

My publisher and I do have plans. We are reaching out to readers on social media. Have given out ARCs. We hope to reach out to libraries and Indie bookstores down the road.

About You

Where do you live now?

I’ve been in New York City for over a decade now and I love every moment of it. That said, I travel to across the country for work and enjoy the different places, food and people everywhere I go.

What are you working on now?

I am currently working on my second novel set during the last days of World War II. The book title is still under wraps because I don’t want to give the story setting away just yet. There was an interesting time period during the Second World War that I chose as the backdrop.

Hitler died, having committed suicide, on April 30th, 1945 but the war in Europe did not end with his death. Germany continued fighting the Allies and surrendered only a week later on May 7th, 1945. During these days between his death and eventual German surrender, an unimaginable series of events took place that remains unexplained and shrouded in mystery to this very day. My second novel revolves around one of those events during that period of uncertainty, with my imagination filling in the blanks that history has left unanswered forever.

I first read about it a few years ago and I always wondered to myself, “What exactly happened there? Why did they the retreating Germans that? Who was really responsible? What were they thinking?”

I searched and searched and searched and never found any satisfactory answers. That was when I said to myself, “Hmm, that’s interesting. The magnitude of what happened then was immense and here we are over 70 years later and we still don’t know much about it.” That’s when I decided to write my second book around these bizarre events.

The first chapter of my second book will be available to all readers of The Girl at the Bar. The details on how to get it will be at the end of my first book.

End of Interview:

For more from Nicholas visit his website or like his Facebook page.

Get your copy of The Girl at the Bar from Amazon US or Amazon UK.