Category Archives: Indieview author

IndieView with Glenn Fain, author of The Woman of My Dreams

He taught me that serious novels don’t have to be limited to this straight reality we perceive through our senses, that we can go crazy and have talking cats and strange sheep-like creatures in our books if we want to, and all is well.

Glenn Fain – 28 February 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Chris Gerrib, author of The Night Watch

Writing is an art, publishing is a business. Never confuse the two.

Chris Gerrib – 25 February 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Liz Kerin, author of The Phantom Forest

I’d say my target reader is an adventurous, imaginative young adult who’s on the cusp of forming their own opinions of the world around them. This person is a seeker after knowledge who wants to explore and ask questions. 

Liz Kerin – 23 February 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Lucy Mihajlich, author of Interface

My target audience is anyone who likes science fiction, young adult, dystopia, pop culture references, or really bad puns. That being said, I found an audience in an unexpected place…

Lucy Mihajlich – 21 February 2017

The Back Flap

It’s 2048, and Big Brother is binge watching.

The future always seemed bright, but it turns out that was just global warming. Meals don’t come in pills, shoes don’t lace themselves, and there are flying cars, but the gas mileage sucks. There is one difference. People have always searched the internet for answers. Now they actually worship it.

Pen Nowen’s father was the founder of Interface, a computer company so big and powerful that people began praying to it. Especially when his death almost tanked the economy.

Seven years later, Pen’s just finished her junior year of high school. For their summer vacations, all of her friends are going to Disneyland, Tijuana, or Disneyland Tijuana, but Pen’s going on a pilgrimage to pray for what’s left of her family. She’s on her way to the Interface flagship store when she gets kidnapped.

It’s the second time this year. She’s about to begin the ransom negotiations when the kidnapper says that he doesn’t want money. He wants something else from her. Before Pen can text 911, he says something even creepier.

He knows the truth about her dad’s death.

About the book

What is the book about?

Interface is a young adult science fiction novel set in 2048. Not much has changed, except that people worship a computer company called Interface. Pen Nowen is the founder’s daughter. She’s a perfectly normal rich, famous, teenage girl until she gets kidnapped by hacktivists.

When did you start writing the book?

I began writing the Interface Series right after my senior year of college.

How long did it take you to write it?

It took me five years to complete all three books.

Where did you get the idea from?

I love books like The Hunger Games and The Maze Runner, but I always wanted to know how we let things get that bad. Interface is the bridge between real life and dystopian fiction. It’s set in a world where we still have a democratic republic, but the president is elected by winning a reality TV show.

Were there any parts of the book where you struggled?

I struggled with world-building, because it meant keeping up with current and emerging technologies, pop culture, and politics. At one point, I had to rewrite a scene because Leonardo DiCaprio finally won an Oscar.

What came easily?

Research came easily for me. I ended up writing a book series that involved neurosurgery, IP spoofing, and the future of chocolate. I knew nothing about any of these things, but one of the reason I love stories is because they can be educational for the writer just as much as they can be educational for the reader.

Are your characters entirely fictitious or have you borrowed from real world people you know?

Interface is a dystopia, so there’s one character in the later books who might be a little bit inspired by Donald Trump.

We all know how important it is for writers to read. Are there any particular authors that have influenced how you write and, if so, how have they influenced you?

My favorite authors are Oscar Wilde, Mary Shelley, Terry Pratchett, Ernest Cline, Cory Doctorow, Andy Weir, and approximately three thousand and eighty-two others.

Do you have a target reader?

My target audience is anyone who likes science fiction, young adult, dystopia, pop culture references, or really bad puns. That being said, I found an audience in an unexpected place.

Interface has an asexual protagonist. When I started marketing my book, the response from the asexual community was overwhelming. There’s very little asexual representation in modern literature, including young adult fiction. It’s hard enough for LGBTQA kids to come to terms with their sexual identity when they’ve actually heard of it, but most adults don’t even know what asexuality is (people who aren’t interested in sex).

About Writing

Do you have a writing process? If so can you please describe it?

Kelly Sue DeConnick, who writes the Hulk for Marvel, came to speak at a comic book class I took during my senior year of college. She said she likes to write in the morning, before her inner editor has a chance to wake up. I wrote most of Interface between 5:00 AM and 7:00 AM.

Do you outline? If so, do you do so extensively or just chapter headings and a couple of sentences?

Another class I took in college was screenwriting. The professor described the writing process in terms of the Tree Method (detailed outline) or the Forest Method (wing it). I use the Leaf Method. I have glossaries, outlines, revision notes, setting floorplans, character guides, and color-coded timelines.

Do you edit as you go or wait until you’ve finished?

I wait until I’m finished or I would never finish.

Did you hire a professional editor?

I hired the incredible David Brookes of St. Paul’s Literary Service to edit Interface. He’s a writer too, so he’s been on both sides of the Google Doc.

Do you listen to music while you write? If yes, what gets the fingers tapping?

Lyrics distract me, so I listen to either classical instrumental music or screamo.

About Publishing

Did you submit your work to Agents?

I originally planned to publish Interface traditionally. I was a first-time author, so I didn’t expect much when I began querying agents, but after a few months, I received an offer of representation from an international literary agency.

What made you decide to go Indie, whether self-publishing or with an indie publisher? Was it a particular event or a gradual process?

My agent asked me to make Interface a romance, because she said it was “crucial to the plot.” When I refused, the offer was withdrawn. I decided to try my luck on Kickstarter.

I came to Kickstarter as a first-time author, without any platform, audience, or clue. I was lucky enough to publish an article about asexuality in Portland’s Bitch Magazine. A lot of people found my Kickstarter through the article, and Interface was 122% funded.

Did you get your book cover professionally done or did you do it yourself?

I had delusions of grandeur and queried John Holcroft about his commission prices. He’s done work for the BBC and the New York Times, so I should have known he was out of my league, but I’ve always loved his art, and he was generous enough to offer me a piece for my cover.

Do you have a marketing plan for the book or are you just winging it?

Winging, but more like crashing and burning.

Any advice that you would like to give to other newbies considering becoming Indie authors?

Stay out of my way (just kidding).

About You

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Astoria, Oregon, and moved to New York for college.

Where do you live now?

Portland, Oregon.

What would you like readers to know about you?

Nothing. I have to maintain my air of mystery.

What are you working on now?

Editing the second and third books of the Interface Series.

End of Interview:

For more from Lucy visit her website.

Get your copy of Interface from Amazon US or Amazon UK.

IndieView with Mansu Edwards, author of Exotic Ignorance and Vertical Algebra

Nas, Big L and Iceberg Slim taught me how to develop better stories. How to visualize the scene and create interesting character dialogue. Rakim and Inspektah Deck are teaching me to use clever and innovative wordplay with my books. 

Mansu Edwards – 18 February 2017

The Back Flap

Exotic Ignorance

A dating ad sparks a revolution in the streets and online.

Vertical Algebra

Motivational quotes from Englishman, Sir Kedcuv Rhinclavu IV translated by a Crater Rock Alien and Mansu Edwards. Also, includes an Alien Pronunciation Boot Index Section to comprehend unique extra terrestrial terms.

About the book

What is the book about?

The 1st book is Exotic Ignorance Ep. 8 Camouflage Pizza It’s about an online personal forum whose users engage in deception, lust and betrayal to achieve specific aims.

The 2nd book Vertical Algebra is inspirational quotes from a Black Englishman translated by me and a Crater Rock Alien from Mars. It includes a pronunciation dictionary to have a better understanding of extraterrestrial terms. The second half includes a bonus book entitled Pierre La Fluent’s Dictionary. It’s my own personal colloquialisms containing sentences to enhance the reader’s experience.

When did you start writing the book?

I started writing Exotic Ignorance in 2015. I wrote Vertical Algebra around 2013 and Pierre La Fluent’s Dictionary around 2014 or 2015.

How long did it take you to write it?

Exotic Ignorance took a year. Vertical Algebra took 3 years. V.A. began as an Ebook, but, then I decided to reformat it and add Pierre La Fluent’s Dictionary to it. Pierre La Fluent’s Dictionary took a year to write.

Where did you get the idea from?

Exotic Ignorance came from perusing and engaging in forums and personal websites. Lol, it’s funny I just told my Barber that I didn’t remember how I thought of the idea for Vertical Algebra. Back in the day, I always used to think of new slang terms when I hung out with my friends. This was maybe 10 years ago. Then, in 2015, I was thinking about a book of my own personal slang. I wanted to do something different than my last book. This year I added sentences to the project so people know how to utilize the words in a sentence.

Were there any parts of the book where you struggled?

Formatting issues. Juggling with multiple endings for Exotic Ignorance.

What came easily?

Slang for Pierre La Fluent and the users conversation in Exotic Ignorance.

Are your characters entirely fictitious or have you borrowed from real world people you know?

Fictitious and real world.

We all know how important it is for writers to read. Are there any particular authors that have influenced how you write and, if so, how have they influenced you?

Wow, great question. I do my best to have my own writing style. I like being original. Authors I respect and push me towards greatness are Nas, Big L, John H. Johnson (Founder of Ebony And Jet), Iceberg Slim, Robert Greene, Rakim, Inspektah Deck, Karen Horney. As you can see it’s a mixture of rappers and authors. Nas, Big L and Iceberg Slim taught me how to develop better stories. How to visualize the scene and create interesting character dialogue. Rakim and Inspektah Deck are teaching me to use clever and innovative wordplay with my books. Robert Greene and Karen Horney helped me to delve into the protagonist and antagonist’s psyche.

Do you have a target reader?

My target reader are those people from 18-35 years old.

About Writing

Do you have a writing process? If so can you please describe it?

Not really. I just hear the words in my head. Or I jot them in a notebook, type it into my phone or labtop.

Do you outline? If so, do you do so extensively or just chapter headings and a couple of sentences?

I don’t outline. I write and see if it’s suitable for public consumption.

Do you edit as you go or wait until you’ve finished?

I do both, but, I try not to edit too much because it can lead to perfectionism. Also, it can lead to not finishing the project if I’m obsessed with editing.

Did you hire a professional editor?

Sometimes.

Do you listen to music while you write? If yes, what gets the fingers tapping?

I mainly write in silence. I did listen to some music while writing the 1st edition of Texting In New York City because I wanted something to push me to be more creative. So, I listened to edm, house and some electronic music.

About Publishing

Did you submit your work to Agents?

No.

What made you decide to go Indie, whether self-publishing or with an indie publisher? Was it a particular event or a gradual process? I

decided to go Indie because I like having control over my work. I want to be creative and innovative. I don’t want anyone to dictate what I write.

Did you get your book cover professionally done or did you do it yourself?

It was professionally done.

Do you have a marketing plan for the book or are you just winging it?

I’m strategizing and throwing around some ideas.

Any advice that you would like to give to other newbies considering becoming Indie authors?

I’m not a newbie, but, I suggest that writers believe in what they’re writing. Always take risks and write as much as possible. So you don’t stress yourself over sales.

About You

Where did you grow up?

I grew up in Brooklyn.

What would you like readers to know about you? I

like Photography, working out, going out to eat and checking different events in the city when I have time. I directed/wrote and produced my first short film, Texting In New York City which is based on my book under the same name.

End of Interview:

For more from Mansu, follow him on Twitter or like his Facebook page.

Get your copy of Exotic Ignorance from Amazon US or Amazon UK.

Get your copy of Vertical Algebra from Amazon US or Amazon UK.

 

IndieView with Steven Joseph, author of The Soul of My Son

My primary target readers are parents of loss and those who are struggling with their grieving process. I believe the nature of my story appeals to many outside that group.

Steven Joseph – 16 February 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Linda Anne Smith, author of Terrifying Freedom

I hit a crossroads where I had to decide whether to wrap up the novel quickly or delve deeper into the lives of the characters. I decided to dive in.

Linda Anne Smith – 9 February 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Taya Okerlund, author of Hurricane Coltrane

I find this also to be true: if an author is too cavalier—too carelessly daring with the truth —I find myself feeling insulted. I’ve lived life too—not only read it. I know honesty when I see it.

Taya Okerlund – 6 February 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with David Kummer, author of Enden

The best part of it all is that you get to write what you want to. There’s no limits.

David Kummer – 2 February 2017 Continue reading

IndieView with Marie Wells Coutu, author of The Secret Heart

While men tell me they enjoy my books, too, what I write is called women’s fiction because the main characters are women who have messed up (haven’t we all?), and I want to show them finding a way to move past their history into a beautiful future.

Marie Wells Coutu – 30 January 2017 Continue reading